Face Value

Face Value

by Gordon Bonnet

Face ValueOn a brutally hot summer day, Tess Ethridge, a beautiful and well-respected elementary school teacher, is stabbed to death while out on a jogging trail. There’s a witness—a quiet, shy man named Quentin Joyner sees the murder take place.

But Quentin isn’t going to be much help to the police. He’s completely face-blind—not only does he have no recognition of others, he wouldn’t even recognize his own face in a mirror. Confronted with inquiries about the events he saw and doubts about his odd perceptual disorder, Quentin comes to the detectives of Snowe Agency for help.

The psychic detectives, under the leadership of the enigmatic Mr. Parsifal Snowe, quickly find out that there’s more to this case than meets the eye. First, Tess Ethridge may not have led as squeaky-clean a life as it seemed. Second, while Quentin’s inability to recognize faces gets him off the hook with the police, the murderer isn’t as quick to believe him, and it’s not long before Quentin turns from a bystander into a target.

Can the detectives of Snowe Agency untangle a web of secrecy, lies, and duplicity in time to unmask a murderer—and save the life of the only witness to the crime? (224 pages, Shannon Press, 2018)

Hardcover: Amazon, B&N
Paperback: Amazon, B&N
Hardcover ISBN: 978-1-63373-418-0
Paperback ISBN: 978-1-63373-419-7
E-Book ISBN: 978-1-63373-420-3
Gordon BonnetGordon Bonnet has been writing fiction for decades. Encouraged when his story Crazy Bird Bends His Beak won critical acclaim in Mrs. Moore’s 1st grade class at Central Elementary School in St. Albans, West Virginia, he embarked on a long love affair with the written word. His interest in the paranormal goes back almost that far, although it has always been tempered by Gordon’s scientific training. This has led to a strange duality; his work as a skeptic and debunker on the popular blog Skeptophilia, while simultaneously writing paranormal and speculative novels, novellas, and short stories. He blogs daily, but is never without a piece of fiction in progress-driven to continue, as he puts it, “because I want to find out how the story ends.” Stay up to date with Gordon and all his writing and appearances on Facebook, Twitter, or at www.gordonbonnet.com. You’ll also find more great fiction on his writing blog, Tales of Whoa.